Supporting people affected by sickle cell disease and their families

Employability Skills Support

We provide employability skills support to young people and adults who have sickle cell or other health conditions. We also provide employability skills to family members and support network of people of who have Sickle Cell, to enable them become financially independent and live normal life as active citizens.

Resource for Children and Young People

We are a resource for children and young people who suffer from sickle cell or other health conditions by providing advice and assistance and organising educational and other activities as a means of advancing in life and helping children and young people who suffer from sickle cell to participate in mainstream society.

Awareness of Sickle Cell Disease

We promote awareness and understanding of sickle cell disease and other forms of disability in children and young people as well as their treatments and prevention. We also provide a helpline and drop in service to parents / carers / siblings to express difficulties they are facing as well as share information and tips that help with everyday life and wellbeing.

Emotional Support

At Great Angels Foundation, we provide emotional support and encouragement to families that have children with Sickle Cell Disease or other health conditions.

Sickle Cell Crises' Period

We provide a range of practical support that assist patients and their families to manage 'sickle cell crises' period.

What You Need to Know

Sickle cell anaemia is a disease passed down through families. It is an inherited condition of the blood and it is considered the most common genetic disease. It is a group of disorders that affects haemoglobin. Haemoglobin is the protein, which carries oxygen to the tissues.

Not contagious

Sickle cell disease is not contagious, but is acquired at birth. It occurs when a child inherits two sickle haemoglobin genes, one from each parent. 

Caused by a genetic abnormality

The disease is caused by a genetic abnormality in the gene for haemoglobin, which results in the production of sickle haemoglobin.

Improved life expectancy

Life expectancy for patients with Hb-SS has increased to a median of 45 years and for HbSC patients to 65 years, a significant improvement from 14.3 years for Hb-SS 3 patients.